2010.13 | Barcode of the Future?

There was a lot of press over the last week or so around RFID tags that can be printed onto packaging  using Carbon Nanotubes in the ink.  This is an interesting development in the world of scanning in retail, given our ongoing obsession with attaining the nirvana of checkout – the non-checkout – as depicted in the famous IBM “You forgot your receipt” commercial from the late 90s.

A few thoughts to consider on using item level RFID tags at point of sale:

Labelling Complexities – Considering the thousands of items for sale in today’s retail stores, expect a migration to RFID to take some time to complete.  For example, while marketers may think RFID means the end of unsightly barcodes, it will be necessary to have some sort of visual code or number on any item in order to allow for pricing in the event of a failed code or reader.  Not having a visual code to type in would cause bottlenecks at point of sale and customer frustration.   Another concern is how RFID readers will recognize items vs cases of items.   Cases of Coke generally have individually barcoded cans as well as a barcode on the case.  Barcodes are visual and the scanner can be directed at the code to ensure it picks up the case code.  Should Coke not put RFID tags on cans in cases?  How do we make the reader read the RFID tag on the case?  These are just two examples of many details that will require consideration.  This will take time and testing to complete.

Scanners – Current scanning technology won’t read RFID tags.  It will be necessary to change the scanning technology at the front end.  For customers with scanner/scales, there may be an upgrade path to avoid entire replacments and simplify a migration from barcodes to item level RFID.  The NCR 7878OFX  has space in the unit for a future RFID reader, allowing one scanner to read both barcodes and RFID tags.  In a grocery environment, a scale will still be needed, so using the current units as much as possible would be a big cost benefit.

Security  – Using RFID tags on every item would potentially eliminate the necessity of EAS tags.  An RFID reader at the door could validate whether an item has been purchased or not when it passes through the door.  It may be more effective in avoiding false positives (false alarms) at the store exit.  There is also the very reasonable concern of privacy advocates that those with readers could read what is in your bag – or even in your house depending on the tag.  There needs to be some sort of tag destruction protocol to avoid that concern.

Like any technology, there are some great upsides, but costs and difficulties must be overcome which will drive the feasibility of this technology out for some years.  I wouldn’t expect to walk through a gate and have everything scanned automagically either – for starters, metal carts mess with the reception, tags in the middle of cases of liquid don’t always read well, and most customers won’t want us weighing every customer to see how much their produce weighs.   Given these issues and the concern around privacy (remember RFID passport hacking?) I don’t believe this will catch on any time soon.  Simplicity and cost are key and this solution isn’t there yet, but I look forward to new developments that could make it happen.

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Comments

  1. any press is good press, right?

    although many of the concerns you bring up in your article have been overcome already (single coke RFID tag vs case coke RFID tag), i still agree… i look forward to see RFID continue to help good ‘ol barcode!

    phil.
    overheer systems.

    • Tim Dickey says:

      Thanks for the comment Phil. I’ve not spent extensive time researching RFID, so while I’ve been privy to proofs of concept in retail, I’ve not seen the details for how we work around multi-packs etc. If you can point me to any articles on line on the subject, I would be very interested!

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