2014.03 | lovelist | electroloom | homechat

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Lovelist – Pinterest is a great tool and quite simple to use.  I use it to remember products or looks that catch my eye and can turn to it for inspiration when I actually look to purchase a new item.  The new app Lovelist takes this to another level by allowing users of the app to scan items and add them to a Pinterest board.  That effectively provides a rudimentary bespoke gift registry as a Pinterest board.  The app allows you not just to take images and describe items you see – as Pinterest’s own mobile app already does – but to scan barcodes on products and have data populate onto a pin that could be added to a board. Scanning minimizes effort for the user and ensures that you are capturing exactly what you see.

This app brings to the fore a potential use for Pinterest as a central gift registry clearing house across all retailers that I think would be relatively simple for Pinterest to implement that could provide them with increased usage as well as some interesting traffic and data. Why not allow users to make a gift registry on Pinterest, and allow other users the ability to anonymously indicate that an item has been purchased.  In fact, Simple Registry already provides this very solution – including the ability to split the cost of larger items.

Where a Pinterest solution could excel is that it can provide cross retailer (even Amazon) registries and the ability to use the app to register and add items.   Pinterest could do this at no charge, and provide retailers the ability to see these registries to allow them to push relevant and timely offers through the life of the registry, understand product affinities and more.

Like every other element of retail, expect the gift registry segment to splinter more and more as there are increasing options for consumers to register on systems outside of retailers. Retailers would be wise to build flexibility into systems and operations to accommodate outside or affiliate solutions like Simple Registry, a Pinterest Registry, or whatever provides the consumer with the experience that suits their needs.    Assist purchasers to search online registries for items that could be purchased in your store, assist them in removing items from the list they have purchased and more.  This means implementing a program with store associates to ensure that they are aware of registry programs beyond the retailer to ensure consumers can shop as they wish in your stores.

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Electroloom – 3D printing is increasingly mainstream.  If you don’t believe it, head down to one of the Makerbot stores.  If you visit, you will see many little printers and scanners happily printing out bracelets and other little trinkets.  Don’t want to leave home?  You can still get the 3D printer experience by using your Xbox One to scan yourself and have the team at Shapify send you a 3D printed action figure of yourself.  While this all seems like silly fun, remember that availability for 3D printables online is growing.  You can find items already on the Pirate Bay, for example, and there many more.

With that in mind, Electroloom is a concept that is getting off the ground with an eye towards enabling the ability to custom print clothing designs on demand at home.  The group are targeting the end of 2014 to have a concept product.  Whether Electroloom is successful or not, this technology is definitely coming and apparel designers and retailers are well advised to stay abreast of developments in this area. Whether enabling printing at a retail store and cutting distribution and unused inventory costs, or allowing printing at home to become a seller of design instead of product, printing apparel has the potential of being a game changer to fashion in the same manner that mp3 and ebooks were to their respective areas.

lg-homechat-ces-2014Homechat – Having recently replaced some appliances in my home, I wondered why I couldn’t connect them to my mobile device to provide notifications.  Seems that the team at LG were thinking along the same lines.   LG’s HomeChat allows for regular language discussions with LG appliances to drive instructions and provide status updates.  While their notion of asking if there is beer in the refrigerator seems somewhat enthusiastic, (how are items going in and out of a fridge getting scanned, what database is it checking to see if something is ‘beer’), the idea is certainly worthy of consideration.   I’m sure I won’t want to program my roomba from the road to change its cleaning schedule, but it would be nice to know if I need to empty its dust receptacle or if my laundry is done.

My experience with the best use of new systems like this is to start with a basic function, get it working in a way that is useful to users and then build out on it.  First, establish basic notifications from appliances, then you can get more sophisticated as the user and solution evolve together.  For instance, start with dishwasher cycle complete notifications, over time move on to notifications that the rinse aid is empty and provide a capability to add it to a grocery list on Evernote or in a grocery app.  As always, the issue is not the technology, it’s how people interact with it and if they gain utility.  Much like email marketing becomes noise, too many messages from anything will quickly become overwhelming.

However this technology progresses, retailers should ensure that they are able to take advantage of feeds from services to make relevant offers or provide help to clients – being able to accept input from a service to an app to add that rinse agent to a grocery list is a good example.  There is no way to be ready for everything, but being open to the idea is a good start.

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